Mindful Musings

Written By Gerald Levine MD

Prior musings have outlined a method of optimizing physical, mental and spiritual health by focusing on self-care and embracing the mindful attitudes of non-judgmental acceptance, patience, curiosity, trust, non-striving and letting go.

Relationships with family members are a common source of stress. We may be disappointed by certain behaviours and hold expectations that are often dashed. Close relatives can be experts at triggering our negative reactions. Anger, disappointment, guilt, shame and frustration are common. If we can apply mindful attitudes to these chronic stresses, we are likely to improve our relationships and well-being.

Read more: Mindful musings number 16

Prior musings have outlined a method of optimizing physical, mental and spiritual health by focusing on self-care and embracing the mindful attitudes of non-judgmental acceptance, patience, curiosity, trust, non-striving and letting go.

Mindfulness is becoming increasingly popular as a tool for well-being. After becoming familiar with mindful concepts, the challenge is to incorporate it into everyday life. Developing daily formal practice is one way of having mindfulness available to you when you need it the most. Formal practice may include breathing awareness meditation, body scan meditation or yoga. There are many guided meditations of various lengths available from the internet. The benefits of practice are well known, including clarity of thought, equanimity and resilience when faced with life’s inevitable stress waves. There are also many obstacles to achieving this. Common examples are not having the time, being interrupted, doubt about the benefits of formal practice and falling asleep when meditating.

Read more: Mindful musings number 17

Managing strong emotions.

Prior musings have outlined a method of optimizing physical, mental and spiritual health by focusing on self-care and embracing the mindful attitudes of non-judgmental acceptance, patience, curiosity, trust, non-striving and letting go.

This musing will focus on the management of strong emotions as an essential element for balanced well-being.

Many of us have been taught to avoid strong emotions, especially negative experiences such as anger, shame, guilt, embarassment and sadness. It is helpful to develop a healthier relationship with our emotions-to see them as useful messages rather than unwanted visitors that overwhelm us.

Read more: Mindful musings of Dr J - Number 18